Press Releases
Telemedicine Is the Pretext for Corporate Intrusion into Medical Licensure
The stated purpose of laws being pushed in numerous state legislatures is to facilitate telemedicine and thereby ease the physician shortage. But the actual effect is to promote the agenda of a wealthy private tax-exempt corporation called the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB), writes Paul Martin Kempen, M.D., Ph.D., in the summer issue of the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons. To be eligible for multistate licensure under the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact, a physician must be board certified and, except for “grandfathered” physicians, undergoing the expensive, time-devouring proprietary “Maintenance of Certification” (MOC) process. In fact, the FSMB-designed Compact... read more
Did a Hospital Deliberately Place Patients at Risk to Retaliate against a Physician?
Hospitals are gaining increasing power to control the practice of medicine, and the independent physician is increasingly disfavored in the “healthcare reform” environment. In the shocking case of orthopedic surgeon Raymond Long, M.D., patients were exposed to contaminated irrigation fluids provided by the hospital. The physician’s efforts to prevent further patient infections were thwarted by the hospital, and instead of hiring a forensic infectious disease expert to investigate, the hospital demanded that the physician obtain a psychiatric evaluation, writes Lawrence Huntoon, M.D., Ph.D. in the summer issue of the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons. In 2002, Dr. Long announced... read more
New Medicare Payment Methods Threaten Medicine as a Profession
New Medicare Payment Methods Threaten Medicine as a Profession
By an overwhelming bipartisan vote, Congress recently enacted a bill that will drastically change how physicians are paid. According to Richard Amerling, M.D., president of the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons (AAPS), the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA) brings into clear focus the destructive effect of Medicare. The draconian pay cuts called for by the maligned “sustainable growth rate” (SGR) formula that MACRA “fixed” were a recent continuation of efforts, beginning immediately after Medicare passed, to contain costs by putting price controls on physicians. Amerling summarizes these in the summer issue of the Journal of American Physicians... read more
More Practices Going ‘Third Party Free’
Faced with increasing bureaucratic demands and declining revenues due to price controls, more and more physicians are opting out of Medicare, Medicaid, and insurance contracts, write neuro-otologists Gerard Gianoli, M.D., and James Soileau, M.D., and office manager Beth Soileau in the summer issue of the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons. In 2008, less than 1 percent of physicians had a third-party-free practice. The number increased to 7.2 percent in 2014, and 13.3 percent are planning to make the transition soon, authors report. The Ear and Balance Institute of Covington, La., made the transition gradually, starting with opting out of... read more
Doubling Fees Would Not Bring Doctors Into Medicaid
Doubling Fees Would Not Bring Doctors Into Medicaid
In a survey of its members conducted by internet and mail, the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons (AAPS) found that a 100 percent increase in fees would cause only 15 percent of nonparticipating physicians to see Medicaid beneficiaries. Currently, only 43 percent of about 300 respondents accept Medicaid. Low fees were the most important reason for only 20 percent of physician who do not participate. "Cost, hassles, and threats" were most important for 58 percent, and a "principled objection" for 30 percent. Nearly 84 percent of respondents say they provide pro bono care for the needy. Only 15 percent... read more
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