Healthcare Reform
AAPS News June 2015 - Who Would Be The “Single Payer”?
Volume 71, no. 6 June 2015 Some advocates of a “single-payer healthcare system,” notably Physicians for a National Health Program (PNHP), often begin with a scathing indictment of managed-care plans, including the complexities of dealing with dozens of them. (They know about these first-hand because they are enabling such plans by their participation.) We often find ourselves in agreement—until they get to their proposed solution. Other advocates of “universal” or “national” plans, such as the American College of Physicians (ACP), are not noted for criticizing managed care—either its business model or its major players such as UnitedHealthcare. Models to emulate... read more
Winners and Losers from King v. Burwell
Winners and Losers from King v. Burwell
This week's health policy news roundup curated by Jane Orient, M.D. New entitlements tend to last forever because of the political uproar when government takes something away. If the U.S. Supreme Court decides, in King v. Burwell, that the government has to follow the words of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and provide subsidies only through state-established exchanges, 7.7 million would lose their health insurance subsidy, of average value $3,156 annually. The public does not pay attention to the Forgotten Man of Amity Shlaes http://www.amityshlaes.com/ --the taxpayer or the creditor who may never be repaid. But if King v. Burwell... read more
Best White House Defense: “It Could Have Been Worse”
Best White House Defense: “It Could Have Been Worse”
This week's health policy news roundup curated by Jane Orient, M.D. White House economist Jason Furman admits that medical costs are up under the Affordable Care Act, but says: “The important thing about this is it’s no worse.” Deductibles shot up 42 percent during the health law’s first year, compared with those for plans available pre-Obamacare. At the same time, thanks to the many regulations and mandates under Obamacare’s Essential Benefit Plan, premiums have also soared. Even with the cheapest Bronze plan, a person would have to pay about 25 percent of a $35,000 income in premiums and deductibles before... read more
Obama Can Veto; Republicans Can Refuse to Pass (But Will They?)
Obama Can Veto; Republicans Can Refuse to Pass (But Will They?)
This week's health policy news roundup curated by Jane Orient, M.D. Helping Democrats “fix” Obamacare is not a good strategy, writes Onan Coca. To pass a bill the President is willing to sign in order to keep the program from crashing is to concede the battle. IF the program is allowed to crash, then the onus will be on the President to sign a free-market alternative. http://eaglerising.com/18005/republicans-making-big-mistake-trying-fix-obamacare/ But will Republicans keep their promise to end ObamaCare? After 6 years, the special interests and crony capitalists are well-entrenched. Have they bought the Republicans who might bring the system down? Illegal ObamaCare... read more
An American Response to Loss of ObamaCare Subsidies
An American Response to Loss of ObamaCare Subsidies
By Jane M. Orient, M.D. This summer, the U.S. Supreme Court could, in King v. Burwell, uninsure 8 million Americans by finding that subsidies are illegal outside State Exchanges. Some Republicans are saying “Let it burn.” For Democrats, it’s “ObamaCare or nothing.” Can you detect a difference? How about an American, rather than a partisan response? One that is voluntary and constitutional. Amid the wreckage left by ObamaCare, one arrangement remains standing, exempt from the individual mandate: the healthcare sharing ministry. This offers the prospect of a solution to the real problems:Medical care costs too much, and so does medical... read more
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